Friday, December 17, 2010

GUEST POST #1

editors note: since my my divshare is down and we have no music, i figured this would be the perfect time to invite some fam to guest post and share some unearthed albums. first up is shit talking extraordinaire know to some as "bad banana," or "frank the tank," or the blog boss of the now retired super duty tough work and current curator of fearless vampire killers (sweet chillwave band name skip). although white as utah, he is to roots what miley cirus is to salvia. RUN IT.........

I am more than happy to pull out some roots heaters to melt this chilly winter weather. Assuming Bob Marley is the common starting point for nearly everyone when it comes to roots allow me to make a very simple metaphor that will help you understand the genre a bit more.

Bob Marley represents roots like Bruce Springsteen represents rock and roll. Now I am not knocking either of those dudes. I am simply saying that if those two are your flag bearers for those genres you are missing the show kids. So let's put some real roots into your ears and you can stop handing djs napkins that say "You got "I Shot The Sheriff" bro?" on them.







Barrington Levy does not make bad records. He started working with the best backing band and producer when he was only 16. All of his earliest LPs have Linval Thompson or Henry Junjo Lawes on the boards, sound mixing by Scientist and music backed by Roots Radics.

Fuck, I could even probably turn out a record with those people in the room. Barrington though is one of the top vocalists to ever come from Jamaica so I'm a just let him handle that shit.

Barrington Levy "Run Come Ya"







This second joint is not for everyone. It's one of those love it or hate it records. Prince Far I basically just reads the bible over extremely heavy roots laid down by The Arabs. His voice is so dark sounding and always cuts through the track and is in a way more memorable than any of the melodies he sings over.

Nearly any 70/80s U.K punk band will cite this record as a huge inspiration even though they couldn't understand have the shit dude was saying.

Prince Far I "Under Heavy Manner"








This record was compiled by the Blood & Fire label and pieces together some 7"s that were chilling in some closet in Jamaica. All the singing is done by Sylford Walker and the deejay chats are done by Welton Irie. It was recorded at Tubby's and has been one of my favorite records for years.

Sylford Walker & Welton Irie "Lamb's Bread International

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